Aquariums

When to Use Sponge Filters for Aquariums

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Written by othmane

The sponge filters are used since the beginning of aquariums. But, many owners of aquariums don’t know the purpose for which they’re designed or don’t even know they exist in any way.

While sponge filters may not be suitable for every tank, there are instances where they’re perfect. They are available in a variety of sizes and shapes and dimensions of the pore, which allows the filter to be customized to various filtration requirements.

The power source can come by a variety of techniques, including powerheads, air pumps, or even a different type of filter.

What is a”sponge filter”?

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Sponge filters are an easy and affordable method of filtering aquarium water. They are a mechanical filtering device that will result in a greater amount of beneficial bacteria within your aquarium and, consequently, an improved balance in the ecosystem of your aquarium.

Using Sponge Filters for Gentle Filtration

Sponge filters are great for situations where gentle and safe filtration is required, like within a fry tank in which young fish may be pulled to the intake of conventional filters.

Fish species like Bettas that don’t flourish in currents that are strong can are benefited from sponge filtering.

Shrimp is another species that require delicate filtration instead of an intake of force that could draw them into.

Sponge filters are great for hospitals tanks since the fish are usually fragile and unable to endure the suction force of an ordinary filter intake.

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Sponge Filters for a New Aquarium

Another reason to use sponge filters can be to help jumpstart an aquarium that is new. The filter can be used on an established aquarium for a period of months or weeks to create bio colonies.

When the new aquarium is established and the sponge is mature, it can be put in a bag of water, then transferred into the tank that is being constructed, thereby keeping the biologicals.

The new tank will get an immediate boost to its biological health that in turn helps the fish that live in the new tank by reducing ammonia and nitrite spikes in the new tank.

A few aquarium owners maintain a mall sponge that is running continuously on one of the tanks so that they’re prepared to put up a new tank and also an emergency aquarium.

Pre-Filter Use

Sponge filters are great as a pre-filter for the canister’s inlet filter. The sponge removes large amounts of bigger particles that prevent the canister from becoming clogged.

It is much easier cleaning or replacing the pre-filter frequently, instead of breaking apart the filter in the canister.

Additional biological filtration is available by this method and the sponge can be used for creating an emergency aquarium in the event of need arise.

If you are using sponge filters with an air pump canister, powerhead, or any other filter, bear in mind that several sponges can be utilized.

This will not only add biological and mechanical filtering capability but also has the benefit of the ability to schedule maintenance to ensure that not all sponges are affected all at once.

This also provides the owner with an extra sponge to plant the tank If desired.

Downsides of Sponge Filters

Sponge filters are fairly simple to maintain. The trick is to ensure that you perform regular maintenance. The most effective method to clean a sponge is to conduct the water change and keep some water you taken out.

In the water from the aquarium after which you gently squeeze and let the sponge go multiple times to remove any particles that have collected. If this process is repeated every couple of weeks the sponge will not stop clogging completely and will last for an extended period of time.

A further issue of filtration using sponges is that they’re not visually attractive. Who would want a large old sponge that is affecting the appeal to their tank? If the location is carefully planned when constructing the aquarium, the appearance of the aquarium can be reduced significantly.

This is particularly true of an aquarium that is well-planted and will hide most of the equipment, like the sponge filter.

Sponge Filter Maintenance

Sponge filters are fairly simple to maintain. The trick is to ensure that you perform regular maintenance. The most effective method to clean a sponge is to conduct the water change and keep some water you taken out.

In the water from the aquarium after which you gently squeeze and let the sponge go multiple times to remove any particles that have collected.

If this process is repeated every couple of weeks the sponge will not stop clogging completely and will last for an extended period of time.

Sponge filters are usually utilized in multiples, either using two inlets or by stacking one over another. If there are several sponges, you should stagger the cleaning process so they don’t have to be cleaned simultaneously.

This reduces the impact on the bio colonies and reduces the risk of ammonia and nitrite spikes upon cleaning.

How to Clean a Sponge Filter

A sponge filter can help clean the aquarium. However, it’s more an empty trash can that holds waste and has to be cleared out often. We suggest cleaning your filter at least once per month or at times when you notice an increase in bubbles (which can be caused by the foam becoming clogged with debris).

When you take the filter from the sponge take the bullseye off of the strainer (i.e. remove the entire top of the filter) so that you are able to take off the foam to clean it.

Use the bag of plastic in order to take the foam from the water to ensure that the debris doesn’t get spread and create a huge chaos in your aquarium.

Make sure you squeeze and squeeze this foam several times over the old tank water.

The sponge filter should be reassembled and put back into the tank.

If you notice a lot of small particles floating around within the waters, sit for a while before the water is filtered by the sponge to clear it up.

Sponge filters are simple to use, cost-effective, and extremely reliable when compared to other types of filters. If you’ve not tried one, take a look at our selection of filters made of sponge and tell us your thoughts!

Should a Fish Tank Filter Make Noise?

Since a Fish Tank Filter is a mechanical device, it’ll produce some sound. The sound that a perfect functioning filter will produce is very low.

If your device is producing loud sounds or vibrating look at the previous sections to get help.

What Causes Fish Tank Filters to Make Noise?

The most common cause of noisy Fish Tank Filters is the debris that accumulates and blocks any flow. There are other causes that could make the filter loud, and we’ll discuss these issues right now.

If filter intakes and filter mediums begin to become plugged with decaying plants, algae, dead fish or food items, and so on. It reduces the flow of water through the filter. This will cause the filtration system to be loud.

When you’ve got an aquarist’s canopy or light that is placed on the tank, occasionally they will begin to shake when operating equipment such as this. Vibration is normal but it can also become extremely loud and irritating.

If the filter is air-filled, like a sponge filter or tubes that draw air, so it can pass over the filter it can result in additional noise. The sponge filters are among the main cause of this kind of noise.

If your sponge is being used is it an air compressor. If you have an older air pump, I’m sure that updating it will reduce the sound. I’m sure of this since I’ve done this and have to declare that the noise difference between an older model and an updated one is in the night and day.

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othmane

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